HOW DO I TREAT
OVERACTIVE BLADDER?

HOW DO I TREAT OVERACTIVE BLADDER?

Overactive bladder is a highly treatable condition but it does require assistance from a doctorii.

MEDICATION

Antismuscarinics are medications that work by blocking certain nerve impulses to the bladder which prevents it from contracting when it shouldn’t. This improves symptoms in some cases but not all and many patients report a feeling of dryness in the mouth (dry mouth) when on this treatment[i].

Another treatment option is beta-3 agonist which works by relaxing the bladder muscles to prevent urgent, frequent, or uncontrolled urination[ii]. It has also been shown to cause fewer dry mouth incidents when compared to antimuscarinics[iii]. For further details on these treatment options, please consult a healthcare professional.

Antimuscarinics are medications that work by blocking certain nerve impulses to the bladder which prevents it from contracting when it shouldn’t contract. This improves symptoms in some cases but not all, as the out come varies depending on the individual. Symptoms may return after completion of one course of medication. Therefore, it is some times recommended for this treatment to be combined with bladder training. Furthermore, many patients report a feeling of dryness in the mouth (dry mouth) when on this treatment.

Another treatment option is beta-3 agonist. Unlike antimuscarinics, this treatment works by stimulating β3 receptors in the muscle of the bladder, causing it to relax. This improves the storage capacity of the bladder without impeding bladder voiding (emptying your bladder), allowing patients with overactive bladder to visit the toilet less frequently and experience fewer incontinence episodesiii,iv,v. It has also been shown to cause fewer dry mouth incidents when compared to antimuscarinicsvi.

References

[i] Nbt.nhs.uk. (2021). Retrieved 19 March 2021, from https://www.nbt.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/attachments/Overactive%20bladder%20syndrome_NBT002734.pdf.
[ii] Overactive Bladder: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention. Cleveland Clinic. (2021). Retrieved 19 March 2021, from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/14248–overactive-bladder-#:~:text=It%20is%20actually%20very%20common,to%20nerve%20stimulation%20(neuromodulation).
[iii] Overactive Bladder: Pathophysiology, Diagnostics, and Therapies, hindawi.com/journals/au/2011/820816/
[iv] Mirabegron, https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a612038.html
[v] Vij, M., & Drake, M. (2015). Clinical use of the β3adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron in patients with overactive bladder syndrome. Therapeutic Advances In Urology, 7(5), 241-248. https://doi.org/10.1177/1756287215591763

[i] Nbt.nhs.uk. (2021). Retrieved 19 March 2021, from https://www.nbt.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/
attachments/Overactive%20bladder
%20syndrome_NBT002734.pdf.
[ii] Overactive Bladder: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention. Cleveland Clinic. (2021). Retrieved 19 March 2021, from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/
diseases/14248–overactive-bladder-#:~:text=It%20is%20actually%20very%
20common,to%20nerve%20stimulation
%20(neuromodulation).
[iii] Overactive Bladder: Pathophysiology, Diagnostics, and Therapies, hindawi.com/journals/au/2011/820816/
[iv] Mirabegron, https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/
a612038.html
[v] Vij, M., & Drake, M. (2015). Clinical use of the β3adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron in patients with overactive bladder syndrome. Therapeutic Advances In Urology, 7(5), 241-248. https://doi.org/10.1177/1756287215591763